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Obstructive sleep apnea affects around 20 million Americans and can lead to hypertension, heart attack, stroke, depression, muscle pain, fibromyalgia, morning headaches, and excessive daytime sleepiness.

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Changes in Diet, Exercise May Prevent Sleep Apnea Progress, Limit Risk for Associated Health Problems


Losing weight through a combination of diet and exercise can have long-term health benefits for those with sleep apnea, including preventing the progress of the condition and possibly lowering the risks of some severe health problems associated with sleep apnea, according to a recent study.

Nearly 20 million Americans are thought to suffer from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), in which a person’s breathing stops repeatedly during sleep and which has been linked to a heightened risk for heart attack, hypertension and stroke. Sleep apnea is especially common among the obese, and a four-year study in Finland focused on obese adults with mild sleep apnea and the effects of lifestyle counseling, and dietary and fitness changes.

In the initial stages of the study, researchers separated 81 obese adults with sleep apnea into two groups: the first group underwent lifestyle counseling, exercised regularly and switched to a low-calorie diet; the second group was given general diet and physical activity information.

The study demonstrated clear health benefits in those who received the lifestyle intervention. The question was, Would the effects last?

After four years, researchers followed up with 57 participants from the two groups. Those in the intervention group were mostly successful in maintaining their weight-loss while most of those in the comparison group had gained some weight.

Furthermore, none of the intervention group’s participants had seen their sleep apnea progress to a severe form of the condition. Twelve participants of the control group went from mild to moderate sleep apnea, while two developed severe sleep apnea.

Obesity is one of the main risk factors for OSA and other forms of sleep apnea, and those who are both overweight and suffer from sleep apnea face an increased risk for diabetes. The findings of this and other recent studies indicate that the sooner people are diagnosed with sleep apnea and make lifestyle changes accompanied by sleep apnea treatment, the better the chance for preventing the progression of sleep apnea and its accompanying health hazards.

If you or a loved one experiences regular, chronic snoring or other symptoms of sleep apnea, please contact I Hate CPAP to locate a dentist near you who is qualified in the field of dental sleep medicine. We welcome patients from Wisconsin, Illinois and across the United States.

posted by Anonymous at 9:20 AM

Thursday, April 18, 2013

Sleep Apnea Awareness Day Shines Light on Dangers, Diagnosis and Treatment of Common Condition


Today is Sleep Apnea Awareness Day, and while it may not be the most celebratory of holidays, it is an important reminder of the potentially fatal health risks faced by the nearly 20 million Americans thought to suffer from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

Sleep Apnea Awareness Day is a multi-organizational effort intended to raise awareness about the dangers of sleep apnea as well as inform people about the increasing availability of sleep apnea diagnosis and treatment. Many people ignore snoring and other symptoms of sleep apnea because they either do not associate these symptoms with a life-threatening condition or they believe the only treatment for sleep apnea is the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) devices.

Sleep apnea, particularly OSA, has been linked to a heightened risk for severe health problems including hypertension, heart attack and stroke. While CPAP treatment, which requires patients to wear a mask attached to a device that circulates oxygen to help maintain an open airway, is effective when used regularly over an extended period of time, many patients find the units cumbersome and uncomfortable, and discontinue its use.

The field of dental sleep medicine, however, offers a number of effective and comfortable alternatives to CPAP. Many patients find success in managing their sleep apnea with the use of custom-made oral appliances similar to sports mouthguards.

If you would like to learn more about sleep apnea diagnosis and treatment or locate a dentist near you who is qualified in dental sleep medicine, please contact I Hate CPAP. We welcome patients from Illinois, Wisconsin and across the United States.

posted by Anonymous at 2:51 PM

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Risk Factors for Obstructive Sleep Apnea


Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is thought to affect nearly 20 million Americans alone, and this life-threatening condition in which your breathing stops periodically during sleep can impact anyone regardless of age, gender or race.

However, there are also factors that indicate an increased risk for sleep apnea. If you suffer from regular loud snoring or other symptoms of sleep apnea and any of the risk factors detailed here apply to you, it is advisable to seek diagnosis for sleep apnea.

Left untreated, OSA can lead to daytime fatigue, recurring headaches and short-term memory problems as well as heighten your risk for severe health problems such as heart attack and hypertension. Traits that indicate a greater risk for developing sleep apnea include:

  • Overweight
  • Large neck size
  • Family history of sleep apnea
  • Narrow airway
  • Enlarged tonsils or adenoids
  • High blood pressure
  • Diabetes

Smokers and those who regularly consume alcohol or sedatives are also at increased risk for sleep apnea. OSA is more common among men, especially those over the age of 60.

There are a number of effective and comfortable sleep apnea treatments available that can help you and your family restore healthy, restful sleep. Many patients find success with the nightly use of custom-made oral appliances, which are designed to fit snugly and maintain an open airway as you sleep.

If you would like to learn more about sleep apnea treatment and locate a dentist near you who is qualified in the field of dental sleep medicine, please contact I Hate CPAP. We are proud to help patients from Illinois, Wisconsin and across the country.

posted by Anonymous at 3:06 PM

Monday, April 8, 2013

New Research May Strengthen Link between Sleep Apnea, ADHD in Kids


Data from a long-term sleep apnea study seems to strengthen the link between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and behavior and learning problems in children.

A review of data from a sleep apnea study involving 263 children between the ages of 6 and 11 indicates that children with OSA may suffer from higher rates attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), many instances of which go undiagnosed. OSA and ADHD are often shared in children, and previous research has suggested that children with sleep apnea experience higher rates of behavior problems and learning disabilities.

The initial study, known as the Tucson Children’s Assessment of Sleep Apnea Study, found that 21 children demonstrated persistent sleep apnea while another 23 developed signs of sleep apnea during the study. A recent five-year follow-up with the participants revealed some good news: 41 of the children who presented with signs of sleep apnea no longer experienced breathing problems during sleep.

However, children who showed signs of sleep apnea during the study also had a higher rate of behavior and learning problems. The full findings of the research, which was led by an assistant professor at the University of Tucson, will be published in the April issue of the journal Sleep.

If your child—or any member of your family—snores regularly or has other symptoms of sleep apnea, a knowledgeable dentist may be able to help. There are a number of comfortable and effective sleep apnea treatments available.

Left untreated, OSA can lead to worsening problems, including an increased risk for severe health problems such as hypertension and heart attack.

If you would like to learn more about sleep apnea diagnosis and treatment, please contact I Hate CPAP today to locate a qualified sleep dentist near you.

posted by Anonymous at 12:18 PM